malformalady:

Morning fog at Kawah Putih(or the White Crater as it is known in English) is a striking crater lake and tourist spot in a volcanic crater about 50 km south of Bandung in West Java in Indonesia. Kawah Putih lakeis one of the two craters which make up Mount Patuha, an andesitic stratovolcano(a “composite” volcano). Mt Patuha is one of numerous volcanoes in Java.
Photo credit: János Hajas

malformalady:

Morning fog at Kawah Putih(or the White Crater as it is known in English) is a striking crater lake and tourist spot in a volcanic crater about 50 km south of Bandung in West Java in Indonesia. Kawah Putih lakeis one of the two craters which make up Mount Patuha, an andesitic stratovolcano(a “composite” volcano). Mt Patuha is one of numerous volcanoes in Java.

Photo credit:

skindeeptales:

Many old-school tattooists recalled seeing their first tattooed person in the sideshow, as the circus sideshow spread tattooing from coast to coast in America. They admitted that this had a major impact on them choosing the art of tattooing for a livelihood.
Ethel Martin Vangi, aka Lady Viola, born in March 1898, was one of those circus troopers causing a stir in the tattoo world and the outdoor amusement business. The Bowery-Coney Island-Brooklyn tattooist Frank Graf tattooed her in the 1920s.
Lady Viola did have a very special suit of tattoos, often being billed as “The Most Beautiful Tattooed Woman in the World.” Along with popular tattoo figures of the time, she had the United States Capitol on her back and the Statue of Liberty and Rock of Ages on her legs. She spent decades in the show business world and was still working with the Thomas Joyland Show at the age of 73!
Although Lady Viola made her name as a tattoo attraction, like many other female attractions (including Betty Broadbent) she also did some tattooing.
She died in april, 1977 and the last pic is one of her last photos.
via Tattoo Archive
 
Zoom Info
skindeeptales:

Many old-school tattooists recalled seeing their first tattooed person in the sideshow, as the circus sideshow spread tattooing from coast to coast in America. They admitted that this had a major impact on them choosing the art of tattooing for a livelihood.
Ethel Martin Vangi, aka Lady Viola, born in March 1898, was one of those circus troopers causing a stir in the tattoo world and the outdoor amusement business. The Bowery-Coney Island-Brooklyn tattooist Frank Graf tattooed her in the 1920s.
Lady Viola did have a very special suit of tattoos, often being billed as “The Most Beautiful Tattooed Woman in the World.” Along with popular tattoo figures of the time, she had the United States Capitol on her back and the Statue of Liberty and Rock of Ages on her legs. She spent decades in the show business world and was still working with the Thomas Joyland Show at the age of 73!
Although Lady Viola made her name as a tattoo attraction, like many other female attractions (including Betty Broadbent) she also did some tattooing.
She died in april, 1977 and the last pic is one of her last photos.
via Tattoo Archive
 
Zoom Info
skindeeptales:

Many old-school tattooists recalled seeing their first tattooed person in the sideshow, as the circus sideshow spread tattooing from coast to coast in America. They admitted that this had a major impact on them choosing the art of tattooing for a livelihood.
Ethel Martin Vangi, aka Lady Viola, born in March 1898, was one of those circus troopers causing a stir in the tattoo world and the outdoor amusement business. The Bowery-Coney Island-Brooklyn tattooist Frank Graf tattooed her in the 1920s.
Lady Viola did have a very special suit of tattoos, often being billed as “The Most Beautiful Tattooed Woman in the World.” Along with popular tattoo figures of the time, she had the United States Capitol on her back and the Statue of Liberty and Rock of Ages on her legs. She spent decades in the show business world and was still working with the Thomas Joyland Show at the age of 73!
Although Lady Viola made her name as a tattoo attraction, like many other female attractions (including Betty Broadbent) she also did some tattooing.
She died in april, 1977 and the last pic is one of her last photos.
via Tattoo Archive
 
Zoom Info
skindeeptales:

Many old-school tattooists recalled seeing their first tattooed person in the sideshow, as the circus sideshow spread tattooing from coast to coast in America. They admitted that this had a major impact on them choosing the art of tattooing for a livelihood.
Ethel Martin Vangi, aka Lady Viola, born in March 1898, was one of those circus troopers causing a stir in the tattoo world and the outdoor amusement business. The Bowery-Coney Island-Brooklyn tattooist Frank Graf tattooed her in the 1920s.
Lady Viola did have a very special suit of tattoos, often being billed as “The Most Beautiful Tattooed Woman in the World.” Along with popular tattoo figures of the time, she had the United States Capitol on her back and the Statue of Liberty and Rock of Ages on her legs. She spent decades in the show business world and was still working with the Thomas Joyland Show at the age of 73!
Although Lady Viola made her name as a tattoo attraction, like many other female attractions (including Betty Broadbent) she also did some tattooing.
She died in april, 1977 and the last pic is one of her last photos.
via Tattoo Archive
 
Zoom Info
skindeeptales:

Many old-school tattooists recalled seeing their first tattooed person in the sideshow, as the circus sideshow spread tattooing from coast to coast in America. They admitted that this had a major impact on them choosing the art of tattooing for a livelihood.
Ethel Martin Vangi, aka Lady Viola, born in March 1898, was one of those circus troopers causing a stir in the tattoo world and the outdoor amusement business. The Bowery-Coney Island-Brooklyn tattooist Frank Graf tattooed her in the 1920s.
Lady Viola did have a very special suit of tattoos, often being billed as “The Most Beautiful Tattooed Woman in the World.” Along with popular tattoo figures of the time, she had the United States Capitol on her back and the Statue of Liberty and Rock of Ages on her legs. She spent decades in the show business world and was still working with the Thomas Joyland Show at the age of 73!
Although Lady Viola made her name as a tattoo attraction, like many other female attractions (including Betty Broadbent) she also did some tattooing.
She died in april, 1977 and the last pic is one of her last photos.
via Tattoo Archive
 
Zoom Info
skindeeptales:

Many old-school tattooists recalled seeing their first tattooed person in the sideshow, as the circus sideshow spread tattooing from coast to coast in America. They admitted that this had a major impact on them choosing the art of tattooing for a livelihood.
Ethel Martin Vangi, aka Lady Viola, born in March 1898, was one of those circus troopers causing a stir in the tattoo world and the outdoor amusement business. The Bowery-Coney Island-Brooklyn tattooist Frank Graf tattooed her in the 1920s.
Lady Viola did have a very special suit of tattoos, often being billed as “The Most Beautiful Tattooed Woman in the World.” Along with popular tattoo figures of the time, she had the United States Capitol on her back and the Statue of Liberty and Rock of Ages on her legs. She spent decades in the show business world and was still working with the Thomas Joyland Show at the age of 73!
Although Lady Viola made her name as a tattoo attraction, like many other female attractions (including Betty Broadbent) she also did some tattooing.
She died in april, 1977 and the last pic is one of her last photos.
via Tattoo Archive
 
Zoom Info
skindeeptales:

Many old-school tattooists recalled seeing their first tattooed person in the sideshow, as the circus sideshow spread tattooing from coast to coast in America. They admitted that this had a major impact on them choosing the art of tattooing for a livelihood.
Ethel Martin Vangi, aka Lady Viola, born in March 1898, was one of those circus troopers causing a stir in the tattoo world and the outdoor amusement business. The Bowery-Coney Island-Brooklyn tattooist Frank Graf tattooed her in the 1920s.
Lady Viola did have a very special suit of tattoos, often being billed as “The Most Beautiful Tattooed Woman in the World.” Along with popular tattoo figures of the time, she had the United States Capitol on her back and the Statue of Liberty and Rock of Ages on her legs. She spent decades in the show business world and was still working with the Thomas Joyland Show at the age of 73!
Although Lady Viola made her name as a tattoo attraction, like many other female attractions (including Betty Broadbent) she also did some tattooing.
She died in april, 1977 and the last pic is one of her last photos.
via Tattoo Archive
 
Zoom Info
skindeeptales:

Many old-school tattooists recalled seeing their first tattooed person in the sideshow, as the circus sideshow spread tattooing from coast to coast in America. They admitted that this had a major impact on them choosing the art of tattooing for a livelihood.
Ethel Martin Vangi, aka Lady Viola, born in March 1898, was one of those circus troopers causing a stir in the tattoo world and the outdoor amusement business. The Bowery-Coney Island-Brooklyn tattooist Frank Graf tattooed her in the 1920s.
Lady Viola did have a very special suit of tattoos, often being billed as “The Most Beautiful Tattooed Woman in the World.” Along with popular tattoo figures of the time, she had the United States Capitol on her back and the Statue of Liberty and Rock of Ages on her legs. She spent decades in the show business world and was still working with the Thomas Joyland Show at the age of 73!
Although Lady Viola made her name as a tattoo attraction, like many other female attractions (including Betty Broadbent) she also did some tattooing.
She died in april, 1977 and the last pic is one of her last photos.
via Tattoo Archive
 
Zoom Info

skindeeptales:

Many old-school tattooists recalled seeing their first tattooed person in the sideshow, as the circus sideshow spread tattooing from coast to coast in America. They admitted that this had a major impact on them choosing the art of tattooing for a livelihood.

Ethel Martin Vangi, aka Lady Viola, born in March 1898, was one of those circus troopers causing a stir in the tattoo world and the outdoor amusement business. The Bowery-Coney Island-Brooklyn tattooist Frank Graf tattooed her in the 1920s.

Lady Viola did have a very special suit of tattoos, often being billed as “The Most Beautiful Tattooed Woman in the World.” Along with popular tattoo figures of the time, she had the United States Capitol on her back and the Statue of Liberty and Rock of Ages on her legs. She spent decades in the show business world and was still working with the Thomas Joyland Show at the age of 73!

Although Lady Viola made her name as a tattoo attraction, like many other female attractions (including Betty Broadbent) she also did some tattooing.

She died in april, 1977 and the last pic is one of her last photos.

via Tattoo Archive

 

brightwalldarkroom:

Excerpt from the new issue: Tess Lynch on American Movie (1999):
"The glimpses of yourself you see in Mark Borchardt shift throughout the years. When I first saw American Movie in 2006, I was working at a vintage clothing store and blithely guzzling vodka sodas until four in the morning; I had recently graduated from college and had plenty of time to land myself in a “30 Under 30” list or apply to graduate school without feeling like I had done so out of professional dissatisfaction. There were no failures yet, only promise. Sure, I was spacing t-shirts that smelled like old sweat for a living, but that was part of the adventure. I was 23, with a decade to create my own passion project before I became a Borchardt. Back then, anyone in their 30’s brave enough to admit they were still figuring out what they were doing with their lives was a joke. I was sure that I and all my friends would magically mature into Real Adults with impenetrable life plans, probably when we were 25 but definitely by the time we were 27. I thought that outcome was inevitable, and that Borchardt was just a goofy exception to the rule.
Eight years later, I am the same age as Borchardt was during the filming of American Movie, and I view things very differently. It’s like the moment when you catch yourself in the mirror, scraping your toddler’s leftovers off a plastic tray, and you see the 3/4 profile of someone you don’t recognize. Someone old. You aren’t old, not technically, just much older than you expected yourself to be. What I now see in Borchardt is a person straddling the divide between the underdog and the loser, between youth and maturity, knowing that he’s at a critical point in his own self-determination but still clueless about what to do with that information.”
—
This is an excerpt from Issue #15 of Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine. To read the rest of this, subscribe now, for just $2/month or $20/year, and read the full issue on ANY phone, tablet, device, or computer.

brightwalldarkroom:

Excerpt from the new issue: Tess Lynch on American Movie (1999):

"The glimpses of yourself you see in Mark Borchardt shift throughout the years. When I first saw American Movie in 2006, I was working at a vintage clothing store and blithely guzzling vodka sodas until four in the morning; I had recently graduated from college and had plenty of time to land myself in a “30 Under 30” list or apply to graduate school without feeling like I had done so out of professional dissatisfaction. There were no failures yet, only promise. Sure, I was spacing t-shirts that smelled like old sweat for a living, but that was part of the adventure. I was 23, with a decade to create my own passion project before I became a Borchardt. Back then, anyone in their 30’s brave enough to admit they were still figuring out what they were doing with their lives was a joke. I was sure that I and all my friends would magically mature into Real Adults with impenetrable life plans, probably when we were 25 but definitely by the time we were 27. I thought that outcome was inevitable, and that Borchardt was just a goofy exception to the rule.

Eight years later, I am the same age as Borchardt was during the filming of American Movie, and I view things very differently. It’s like the moment when you catch yourself in the mirror, scraping your toddler’s leftovers off a plastic tray, and you see the 3/4 profile of someone you don’t recognize. Someone old. You aren’t old, not technically, just much older than you expected yourself to be. What I now see in Borchardt is a person straddling the divide between the underdog and the loser, between youth and maturity, knowing that he’s at a critical point in his own self-determination but still clueless about what to do with that information.”

This is an excerpt from Issue #15 of Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine. To read the rest of this, subscribe now, for just $2/month or $20/year, and read the full issue on ANY phone, tablet, device, or computer.

auteurstearoom:

Orson Welles and Charlie Chaplin have a conversation together. The pair worked together on Monsieur Verdoux, a film Welles himself had considered directing (He was only credited with ‘Idea by’).

auteurstearoom:

Orson Welles and Charlie Chaplin have a conversation together.

The pair worked together on Monsieur Verdoux, a film Welles himself had considered directing (He was only credited with ‘Idea by’).